CISPLATIN (CHEMO MED)


WE ARE THE MIGHTY FAMILY: As I sit here and write this, I can’t seem to stop crying. My heart is broken as I see my wife struggle and fight for every inch of her life. She is not only fighting for her selves but she is fighting for our daughters. There are many things that people who have not ever gone through this will understand and will not get it. People usually know the start of Cancer or the end of it. Most people do not know how we feel. This last chemo treatment was without a doubt the worst one thus far. This is just a simple example of the medication my wife has to take. These are the side effects and what her body has to go through. Read and educate yourselves because you never know when you or someone you love might go through this.    

 xside-effects3521421482937276874.jpg

Cisplatin

(SIS pla tin)
Trade Names: Platinol®, Platinol®-AQ
Other Name: CDDP
Cisplatin is the generic name for the trade name drug Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ. In some cases, health care professionals may use the trade name Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ, or other names such as CDDP, when referring to the generic drug name cisplatin.
Drug Type:
Cisplatin is an anti-cancer (“antineoplastic” or “cytotoxic”) chemotherapy drug. This medication is classified as an “alkylating agent.” (For more detail, see “How Cisplatin Works” section below).

What Cisplatin Is Used For:
Treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic ovarian cancer, and metastatic testicular cancer. Testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, esophageal, small and non-small cell lung, breast, cervical, stomach and prostate cancers. Also to treat Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, neuroblastoma, sarcomas, multiple myeloma, melanoma, and mesothelioma.
Note: If a drug has been approved for one use, physicians may elect to use this same drug for other problems if they believe it may be helpful.

How Cisplatin Is Given:
Cisplatin is administered through a vein (intravenously or IV) as an infusion.
There is no pill form of cisplatin.
Cisplatin is an irritant. An irritant is a chemical that can cause inflammation of the vein through which it is given.
If cisplatin escapes from the vein it can cause tissue damage. The nurse or doctor who gives cisplatin must be carefully trained. If you experience pain or notice redness or swelling at the IV site while you are receiving cisplatin, alert your health care professional immediately.
Before and/or after the cisplatin infusion, extra IV fluids are given and care is taken to ensure adequate hydration before both during and after cisplatin, to protect your kidney function.
Cisplatin also has been used as an infusion into the abdominal cavity (contains the abdominal organs).
The amount of cisplatin that you receive depends on many factors, including your height and weight, your general health or other health problems, and the type of cancer that you have. Your doctor will determine your dose and schedule.

Side Effects:
Important things to remember about cisplatin side effects:
Most people do not experience all of the cisplatin side effects listed.
Cisplatin side effects are often predictable in terms of their onset, duration, and severity.
Cisplatin side effects will improve after therapy is complete.
Cisplatin side effects may be quite manageable. There are many options to help minimize or prevent the side effects of cisplatin.
There is no relationship between the presence or severity of Cisplatin side effects and effectiveness of cisplatin.

The following side effects are common (occurring in greater than 30%) for patients taking Cisplatin:
Nausea and vomiting. Nausea may last up to 1 week after therapy. Anti-nausea medication is given before the infusion, and a prescription is also given for use after.
Low blood counts. Your white and red blood cells and platelets may temporarily decrease. This can put you at increased risk for infection, anemia, and/or bleeding. Nadir: Meaning low point, is the point in time between chemotherapy cycles in which you experience low blood counts.
Nadir: 18-23 days. Recovery: 39 days
Kidney toxicity. Effects on kidney function are dose related, observed 10-20 days after therapy, and are generally reversible.
Ototoxicity hearing loss, ringing in the ears.
Blood test abnormalities (low magnesium, low calcium, low potassium)

These are less common side effects (occurring in 10-29%) for patients receiving Cisplatin:
Peripheral neuropathy: Although less common, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the extremities) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued. These side effects may become progressively more severe with continued treatment, and your doctor may decide to decrease your dose. Neurologic effects may be irreversible.
Loss of appetite
Taste changes, metallic taste
Increases in blood tests measuring liver function. These return to normal once treatment is discontinued. (see liver problems).
Hair loss may cause hair loss; however, this side effect is uncommon.
Not all cisplatin side effects are listed above, some that are rare (occurring in less than 10% of patients) are not listed here. However, you should always inform your health care provider if you experience any unusual symptoms.

Precautions:
Before starting cisplatin treatment, make sure you tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking (including prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins, herbal remedies, etc.). Do not take aspirin, products containing aspirin unless your doctor specifically permits this.
Cisplatin may be inadvisable if you have a history of severe allergic reaction to cisplatin, carboplatin, other platinum-containing formulations or mannitol.
Do not receive any kind of immunization or vaccination without your doctor’s approval while taking cisplatin.
Your fertility, meaning your ability to conceive or father a child, may be affected by cisplatin. Please discuss this issue with your health care provider.
Inform your health care professional if you are pregnant or may be pregnant prior to starting this treatment. Pregnancy category D (Cisplatin may be hazardous to the fetus. Women who are pregnant or become pregnant must be advised of the potential hazard to the fetus).
For both men and women: Use contraceptives, and do not conceive a child (get pregnant) while taking cisplatin. Barrier methods of contraception, such as condoms, are recommended. Discuss with your doctor when you may safely become pregnant or conceive a child after therapy.
Do not breast feed while taking cisplatin.

How Cisplatin Works:
Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. “Normal” cell stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division).
The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis).
Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles.
Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The “normal” cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The “normal” cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body.
Cisplatin is classified as an alkylating agent. Alkylating agents are most active in the resting phase of the cell. These drugs are cell cycle non-specific.
Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health care professional about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute for medical advice.
Reference:
Cisplatin, Lexicomp Online®. [11/21/2016; Lexi-Drugs. 11/17/2016]. Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; November 21, 2016.

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CISPLATIN (CHEMO MED)


WE ARE THE MIGHTY FAMILY: As I sit here and write this, I can’t seem to stop crying. My heart is broken as I see my wife struggle and fight for every inch of her life. She is not only fighting for her selves but she is fighting for our daughters. There are many things that people who have not ever gone through this will understand and will not get it. People usually know the start of Cancer or the end of it. Most people do not know how we feel. This last chemo treatment was without a doubt the worst one thus far. This is just a simple example of the medication my wife has to take. These are the side effects and what her body has to go through. Read and educate yourselves because you never know when you or someone you love might go through this.    

 xside-effects3521421482937276874.jpg

Cisplatin

(SIS pla tin)
Trade Names: Platinol®, Platinol®-AQ
Other Name: CDDP
Cisplatin is the generic name for the trade name drug Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ. In some cases, health care professionals may use the trade name Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ, or other names such as CDDP, when referring to the generic drug name cisplatin.
Drug Type:
Cisplatin is an anti-cancer (“antineoplastic” or “cytotoxic”) chemotherapy drug. This medication is classified as an “alkylating agent.” (For more detail, see “How Cisplatin Works” section below).

What Cisplatin Is Used For:
Treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic ovarian cancer, and metastatic testicular cancer. Testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, esophageal, small and non-small cell lung, breast, cervical, stomach and prostate cancers. Also to treat Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, neuroblastoma, sarcomas, multiple myeloma, melanoma, and mesothelioma.
Note: If a drug has been approved for one use, physicians may elect to use this same drug for other problems if they believe it may be helpful.

How Cisplatin Is Given:
Cisplatin is administered through a vein (intravenously or IV) as an infusion.
There is no pill form of cisplatin.
Cisplatin is an irritant. An irritant is a chemical that can cause inflammation of the vein through which it is given.
If cisplatin escapes from the vein it can cause tissue damage. The nurse or doctor who gives cisplatin must be carefully trained. If you experience pain or notice redness or swelling at the IV site while you are receiving cisplatin, alert your health care professional immediately.
Before and/or after the cisplatin infusion, extra IV fluids are given and care is taken to ensure adequate hydration before both during and after cisplatin, to protect your kidney function.
Cisplatin also has been used as an infusion into the abdominal cavity (contains the abdominal organs).
The amount of cisplatin that you receive depends on many factors, including your height and weight, your general health or other health problems, and the type of cancer that you have. Your doctor will determine your dose and schedule.

Side Effects:
Important things to remember about cisplatin side effects:
Most people do not experience all of the cisplatin side effects listed.
Cisplatin side effects are often predictable in terms of their onset, duration, and severity.
Cisplatin side effects will improve after therapy is complete.
Cisplatin side effects may be quite manageable. There are many options to help minimize or prevent the side effects of cisplatin.
There is no relationship between the presence or severity of Cisplatin side effects and effectiveness of cisplatin.

The following side effects are common (occurring in greater than 30%) for patients taking Cisplatin:
Nausea and vomiting. Nausea may last up to 1 week after therapy. Anti-nausea medication is given before the infusion, and a prescription is also given for use after.
Low blood counts. Your white and red blood cells and platelets may temporarily decrease. This can put you at increased risk for infection, anemia, and/or bleeding. Nadir: Meaning low point, is the point in time between chemotherapy cycles in which you experience low blood counts.
Nadir: 18-23 days. Recovery: 39 days
Kidney toxicity. Effects on kidney function are dose related, observed 10-20 days after therapy, and are generally reversible.
Ototoxicity hearing loss, ringing in the ears.
Blood test abnormalities (low magnesium, low calcium, low potassium)

These are less common side effects (occurring in 10-29%) for patients receiving Cisplatin:
Peripheral neuropathy: Although less common, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the extremities) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued. These side effects may become progressively more severe with continued treatment, and your doctor may decide to decrease your dose. Neurologic effects may be irreversible.
Loss of appetite
Taste changes, metallic taste
Increases in blood tests measuring liver function. These return to normal once treatment is discontinued. (see liver problems).
Hair loss may cause hair loss; however, this side effect is uncommon.
Not all cisplatin side effects are listed above, some that are rare (occurring in less than 10% of patients) are not listed here. However, you should always inform your health care provider if you experience any unusual symptoms.

Precautions:
Before starting cisplatin treatment, make sure you tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking (including prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins, herbal remedies, etc.). Do not take aspirin, products containing aspirin unless your doctor specifically permits this.
Cisplatin may be inadvisable if you have a history of severe allergic reaction to cisplatin, carboplatin, other platinum-containing formulations or mannitol.
Do not receive any kind of immunization or vaccination without your doctor’s approval while taking cisplatin.
Your fertility, meaning your ability to conceive or father a child, may be affected by cisplatin. Please discuss this issue with your health care provider.
Inform your health care professional if you are pregnant or may be pregnant prior to starting this treatment. Pregnancy category D (Cisplatin may be hazardous to the fetus. Women who are pregnant or become pregnant must be advised of the potential hazard to the fetus).
For both men and women: Use contraceptives, and do not conceive a child (get pregnant) while taking cisplatin. Barrier methods of contraception, such as condoms, are recommended. Discuss with your doctor when you may safely become pregnant or conceive a child after therapy.
Do not breast feed while taking cisplatin.

How Cisplatin Works:
Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. “Normal” cell stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division).
The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis).
Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles.
Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The “normal” cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The “normal” cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body.
Cisplatin is classified as an alkylating agent. Alkylating agents are most active in the resting phase of the cell. These drugs are cell cycle non-specific.
Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health care professional about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute for medical advice.
Reference:
Cisplatin, Lexicomp Online®. [11/21/2016; Lexi-Drugs. 11/17/2016]. Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; November 21, 2016.

CISPLATIN (CHEMO MED)


WE ARE THE MIGHTY FAMILY: As I sit here and write this, I can’t seem to stop crying. My heart is broken as I see my wife struggle and fight for every inch of her life. She is not only fighting for her selves but she is fighting for our daughters. There are many things that people who have not ever gone through this will understand and will not get it. People usually know the start of Cancer or the end of it. Most people do not know how we feel. This last chemo treatment was without a doubt the worst one thus far. This is just a simple example of the medication my wife has to take. These are the side effects and what her body has to go through. Read and educate yourselves because you never know when you or someone you love might go through this.    

 xside-effects3521421482937276874.jpg

Cisplatin

(SIS pla tin)
Trade Names: Platinol®, Platinol®-AQ
Other Name: CDDP
Cisplatin is the generic name for the trade name drug Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ. In some cases, health care professionals may use the trade name Platinol® and Platinol®-AQ, or other names such as CDDP, when referring to the generic drug name cisplatin.
Drug Type:
Cisplatin is an anti-cancer (“antineoplastic” or “cytotoxic”) chemotherapy drug. This medication is classified as an “alkylating agent.” (For more detail, see “How Cisplatin Works” section below).

What Cisplatin Is Used For:
Treatment of advanced bladder cancer, metastatic ovarian cancer, and metastatic testicular cancer. Testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, esophageal, small and non-small cell lung, breast, cervical, stomach and prostate cancers. Also to treat Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, neuroblastoma, sarcomas, multiple myeloma, melanoma, and mesothelioma.
Note: If a drug has been approved for one use, physicians may elect to use this same drug for other problems if they believe it may be helpful.

How Cisplatin Is Given:
Cisplatin is administered through a vein (intravenously or IV) as an infusion.
There is no pill form of cisplatin.
Cisplatin is an irritant. An irritant is a chemical that can cause inflammation of the vein through which it is given.
If cisplatin escapes from the vein it can cause tissue damage. The nurse or doctor who gives cisplatin must be carefully trained. If you experience pain or notice redness or swelling at the IV site while you are receiving cisplatin, alert your health care professional immediately.
Before and/or after the cisplatin infusion, extra IV fluids are given and care is taken to ensure adequate hydration before both during and after cisplatin, to protect your kidney function.
Cisplatin also has been used as an infusion into the abdominal cavity (contains the abdominal organs).
The amount of cisplatin that you receive depends on many factors, including your height and weight, your general health or other health problems, and the type of cancer that you have. Your doctor will determine your dose and schedule.

Side Effects:
Important things to remember about cisplatin side effects:
Most people do not experience all of the cisplatin side effects listed.
Cisplatin side effects are often predictable in terms of their onset, duration, and severity.
Cisplatin side effects will improve after therapy is complete.
Cisplatin side effects may be quite manageable. There are many options to help minimize or prevent the side effects of cisplatin.
There is no relationship between the presence or severity of Cisplatin side effects and effectiveness of cisplatin.

The following side effects are common (occurring in greater than 30%) for patients taking Cisplatin:
Nausea and vomiting. Nausea may last up to 1 week after therapy. Anti-nausea medication is given before the infusion, and a prescription is also given for use after.
Low blood counts. Your white and red blood cells and platelets may temporarily decrease. This can put you at increased risk for infection, anemia, and/or bleeding. Nadir: Meaning low point, is the point in time between chemotherapy cycles in which you experience low blood counts.
Nadir: 18-23 days. Recovery: 39 days
Kidney toxicity. Effects on kidney function are dose related, observed 10-20 days after therapy, and are generally reversible.
Ototoxicity hearing loss, ringing in the ears.
Blood test abnormalities (low magnesium, low calcium, low potassium)

These are less common side effects (occurring in 10-29%) for patients receiving Cisplatin:
Peripheral neuropathy: Although less common, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the extremities) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued. These side effects may become progressively more severe with continued treatment, and your doctor may decide to decrease your dose. Neurologic effects may be irreversible.
Loss of appetite
Taste changes, metallic taste
Increases in blood tests measuring liver function. These return to normal once treatment is discontinued. (see liver problems).
Hair loss may cause hair loss; however, this side effect is uncommon.
Not all cisplatin side effects are listed above, some that are rare (occurring in less than 10% of patients) are not listed here. However, you should always inform your health care provider if you experience any unusual symptoms.

Precautions:
Before starting cisplatin treatment, make sure you tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking (including prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins, herbal remedies, etc.). Do not take aspirin, products containing aspirin unless your doctor specifically permits this.
Cisplatin may be inadvisable if you have a history of severe allergic reaction to cisplatin, carboplatin, other platinum-containing formulations or mannitol.
Do not receive any kind of immunization or vaccination without your doctor’s approval while taking cisplatin.
Your fertility, meaning your ability to conceive or father a child, may be affected by cisplatin. Please discuss this issue with your health care provider.
Inform your health care professional if you are pregnant or may be pregnant prior to starting this treatment. Pregnancy category D (Cisplatin may be hazardous to the fetus. Women who are pregnant or become pregnant must be advised of the potential hazard to the fetus).
For both men and women: Use contraceptives, and do not conceive a child (get pregnant) while taking cisplatin. Barrier methods of contraception, such as condoms, are recommended. Discuss with your doctor when you may safely become pregnant or conceive a child after therapy.
Do not breast feed while taking cisplatin.

How Cisplatin Works:
Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. “Normal” cell stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division).
The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis).
Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles.
Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The “normal” cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The “normal” cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body.
Cisplatin is classified as an alkylating agent. Alkylating agents are most active in the resting phase of the cell. These drugs are cell cycle non-specific.
Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health care professional about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute for medical advice.
Reference:
Cisplatin, Lexicomp Online®. [11/21/2016; Lexi-Drugs. 11/17/2016]. Hudson, Ohio: Lexi-Comp, Inc.; November 21, 2016.

OUR FIGHT…. 2 YEARS LATER AND SHE IS STILL FIGHTING.


20180918_0432154049815471708383352.jpg
mks

TO DONATE: TO SLOAN-KETTERING CLICK BELOW

https://secure2.convio.net/mskcc/site/SPageServer?pagename=giv_DonationForm&donID=10070

On September 20th, 2016 my wife had a real bad stomach pain. She went to the hospital to have her self-checked out. They found fluids in her abdomen and saw that her liver was too big. This was the start of our living nightmare.

After almost ten days in the hospital doctors could not figure out what was causing this disruption in my wife body. After what felt like a million tests done on her they told us they suspected Cancer to be the cause of it and that they wanted to do a biopsy of something they saw in her stomach lining.

Two weeks after the biopsy we got the results. With a sad and heavy heart we now know that she has stage 4 mesothelioma. This is an asbestos caused Cancer.

mes·o·the·li·o·ma

ˈmezəˌTHēlēˈōmə,ˌmē-/

noun: mesothelioma; plural noun: mesotheliomas

a cancer of mesothelial tissue, associated especially with exposure to asbestos.

That initial second they tell you that it is stage 4 cancer it feels like you just got hit with a baseball bat. I felt scared, weak, and lost in this world with just the thought of losing my wife. A million more thoughts ran through my mind and it became harder to focus on anything else being said. I kept thinking of our daughters. I knew I had to readjust myself.

After the initial reaction I started to focus more on how much harder this was on my wife. She had this look on her face as she felt guilty that she was putting us through this. As I hugged her and told her we are going to fight this and that this was not her fault she just apologized. My heart broke and I started to cry. She looked at me and told me to stop crying as she needs me to be the strong one and be the rock to keep our family strong.

We would like to take this time to thank all of our friends and family for the great support. All we ask for is prayers and good thoughts for us. Please people if you can donate money to charities like Stand Up For Cancer and the American Cancer Society. We are in the process of taking my wife to Memorial Sloan Kettering Center so if you can donate and help them help us we would appreciate it.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

ana

 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

smartselect_20180928-045148_chrome7544087442157995865.jpg

Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

smartselect_20180928-045148_chrome7544087442157995865.jpg

Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

smartselect_20180928-045148_chrome7544087442157995865.jpg

Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

MIGHTY FAMILY WE WILL ALWAYS FIGHT


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AS MANY OF YOU KNOW BY NOW OUR LAST CT SCAN REVEALED 2 NEW QUATER SIZE TUMORS. WE ARE LOOKING FOR PRAYERS,  WE ARE NOT LOOKING FOR PITY. AS WE WANT TO EDUCATE PEOPLE ON THIS REAL LIFE ISSUE WE HAVE TO ENDURE DAY IN AND DAY OUT.

I DON’T THINK PEOPLE UNDERSTAND HOW DANGEROUS IS AN ASBESTOS GROWN CANCER . THIS ARTICLE WOULD GIVE YOU A BETTER UNDERSTANDING ON THE TYPE OF CANCER WE ARE FIGHTING.

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What is Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

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Peritoneal mesothelioma accounts for 20 to 25 percent of all mesothelioma cases. It is the most common diagnosis after pleural mesothelioma. Peritoneal patients have longer life expectancies than those with other types of mesothelioma. Some studies report patients living upwards of 5 years after cytoreductive surgery.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is difficult due to non specific signs and symptoms. It is often confused with abdominal distension (gas) and irritable bowel syndrome. Most patients do not experience symptoms until the disease has progressed. CT scans are the most useful imaging tool to initially test for peritoneal mesothelioma.
Doctors may also use a technique called peritoneoscopy. During this procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision on the patient’s abdomen and uses a small camera to explore the abdomen. There is also a tool on the camera that helps to extract tissue on the peritoneum to test for mesothelioma. These tissue biopsies are needed for confirmation of a diagnosis.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma BodyDoctors do not use a standard staging system when diagnosing peritoneal mesothelioma. Generally, before the tumors start to spread, the disease is centralized to the abdomen. As it progresses to stage 2, the mesothelioma may spread more but is still contained in the peritoneum. In the final stage, stage 4, the mesothelioma has spread to other organs, such as the liver and colon.

Prognosis

Although there isn’t currently a cure for peritoneal mesothelioma, many patients have a hopeful prognosis. The median survival time for patients who have not had the cytoreductive surgery is about a year; however, in patients who have had the surgery, survival times increase by up to five years. The most successful cases are those whose mesothelioma is detected in the earlier stages and begin treatment immediately. Most of theses cases include a cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC.

 

PATRICIA WALSH “IN HER OWN WORDS”


World record-holding Paralympian, engineer and competitive rower Patricia Walsh lives to serve as an example of life lived beyond perceived limitations. She won’t let blindness define her or put a ceiling on her lofty goals.

WATCH PATRICA’S VIDEO BELOW

By Patricia Walsh

I spend no time wishing my life was different. At age 5, I lost vision in my right eye due to a brain tumor over my optic cortex. In my early teens, scarring from surgeries resulted in total blindness with only a small field of light perception in my left eye. I can’t see my hand at the end of my arm.

Growing up as a person with blindness, I was spoon-fed the idea that every decision had to be governed by my limitations. From school to sports, if it wasn’t accessible, I was made to believe it was not for me. But a person who goes blind is still the same person they always were, and all my life I felt untapped potential. I was born ambitious. Staying inside where it is safe and sound was so limiting. I wanted to step outside the safety to explore my own capability. I knew in order to tap any of my potential, I would have to learn to adapt to the world; the world was not going to adapt to me.

When I expressed interest in attending college, I was told it would be an exercise in failure. But I knew that higher education was the key to becoming self-reliant. So I bet on myself and enrolled at Oregon State University. Was it tough? Unbelievably. Did I receive special treatment? None. But beyond the degrees I earned, I learned a lot about myself and my capacity to overcome in those years.

It was during college that I took up running. Learning to run undoubtedly changed my life. The first time I ran, I had no idea how to make it accessible. I found a trail near my house and ran with one foot on the concrete trail and the other on the gravel. I ran a mile successfully but had no plan how to get home, so I had to recruit help from another runner. The next day, I put a rock on the edge of the trail. I ran a half-mile one way, then a half-mile home. When I hit the rock, I fell. That is how I knew I was back home.

I later learned about guides. By tethering myself to a sighted person, I was eventually able to run 12 marathons, 2 long-distance triathlons, 2 ultramarathons, become a 5-time U.S. national champion, 2012 USA Triathlon athlete of the year, 3-time World Championship bronze medalist, 2016 Paralympian and world record-holder for fastest blind and low-vision long-distance triathlon.

Athletics changed the way I saw myself. For the first time, I had some fodder to believe in myself. I was not the blind girl anymore; I was a competitive athlete. When I was pushed out of my comfort zone, I could achieve so much more than I ever knew possible. I used to look at every decision and ask, “Is this accessible?” Nothing is made with me in mind, so the answer was always no. Ever since I ran that first mile, I look at every decision with the mindset that I may not know how I am going to do this, but I will find a way.

In 2006, I graduated from Oregon State with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science. I was employed immediately by Microsoft. I have since had a thriving career in engineering, currently as lead technical product manager for Dow Jones.

I am forever pushing to the next level in both my career and athletics. If I am not a little uncomfortable, then I am probably not pushing myself hard enough. Over the past year, I’ve been transitioning from a runner and a triathlete to a rower. To start over in a new sport is humbling. I made it to national team selection camp as a long shot. To be a long shot feels like a failure, even if it’s truly a sign of success to be considered at all as a newcomer in this sport. It is in these moments I remind myself that I am here to grow as an athlete. Being uncomfortable means I am on track to become better. I cannot claim experience on the water where there is none. I can demonstrate improvement every day. I can be coachable. I can be a supportive teammate.

I remind myself why I am here. It is my hope to help others live a life beyond their perceived limitations. What’s my next big goal? I aim to represent the U.S. in the 2020 Paralympics, and I believe this is an opportunity to lift up others in the process.

I’d love to help each and every one of you achieve your own blind ambitions. Read more of my story in my book, “Blind Ambition: How to Envision Your Limitless Potential and Achieve the Success You Want.”  

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