3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

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Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

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3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

smartselect_20180928-045148_chrome7544087442157995865.jpg

Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER


END THE YEAR WITH A BANG AND JOIN THE I.A.B.F. 

3rd ANNUAL I.A.B.F. DINNER

Please join the Italian American Baseball Foundation
as we welcome a select group of Baseball VIP’s
for the 3rd Annual fundraising dinner & cocktail reception.
Thursday, December 6, 2018

ItalianAmericanBaseballFoundationLogo.jpg

Italian American Baseball Foundation 2018 Guest of Honor
John Franco
2018 IABF Baseball Executive
Jon Morosi
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

smartselect_20180928-045148_chrome7544087442157995865.jpg

Date:            

Thursday, December 6, 2018    

       Location:

smartselect_20180929-082259_google1706874221584198882.jpg

WORLD FAMOUS
Carmine’s Sports Bar and Restaurant
358 Graham Ave
Brooklyn, New York

Tickets:
Cocktail Hour and Dinner – $500.00

GUEST SPEAKERS

Mark Cardillo – Villanova University
Gilberto Gerali – Italian National Team , Manager

EVENING MC

Mets Radio announcer – Wayne Randazzo

EVENING ACTIVITIES

“2018 IABF Guest of Honor” Mets Hall of Famer – John Franco
“2018 IABF Executive Honor” MLB networks – Jon Morosi
Video preview from our 2018 IABF visit to Italy with John Franco and Mark Cardillo

ART, AUCTIONS, AND MEMORABILIA

Featuring the Sports Art of James Fiorentino
“Experience” Auction items by Grandstand Sports
IABF and Team Italia apparel will be available

The Italian American Baseball Foundation (IABF) is a 501(c)(3) charity foundation.
Our mission is to bring awareness of the game to Italian youth
through clinics, camps, and education.
To provide scholarships or financial assistance to student-athletes
that qualify academically to play baseball in the
United States on the College and/or High School level.
Our future plans include developing a youth baseball academy in Italy.

CLICK ON LINK TO PURCHASE TICKETS

 

 

MIGHTY FAMILY WE WILL ALWAYS FIGHT


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AS MANY OF YOU KNOW BY NOW OUR LAST CT SCAN REVEALED 2 NEW QUATER SIZE TUMORS. WE ARE LOOKING FOR PRAYERS,  WE ARE NOT LOOKING FOR PITY. AS WE WANT TO EDUCATE PEOPLE ON THIS REAL LIFE ISSUE WE HAVE TO ENDURE DAY IN AND DAY OUT.

I DON’T THINK PEOPLE UNDERSTAND HOW DANGEROUS IS AN ASBESTOS GROWN CANCER . THIS ARTICLE WOULD GIVE YOU A BETTER UNDERSTANDING ON THE TYPE OF CANCER WE ARE FIGHTING.

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What is Peritoneal Mesothelioma?

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Peritoneal mesothelioma accounts for 20 to 25 percent of all mesothelioma cases. It is the most common diagnosis after pleural mesothelioma. Peritoneal patients have longer life expectancies than those with other types of mesothelioma. Some studies report patients living upwards of 5 years after cytoreductive surgery.

Diagnosis

Diagnosing malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is difficult due to non specific signs and symptoms. It is often confused with abdominal distension (gas) and irritable bowel syndrome. Most patients do not experience symptoms until the disease has progressed. CT scans are the most useful imaging tool to initially test for peritoneal mesothelioma.
Doctors may also use a technique called peritoneoscopy. During this procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision on the patient’s abdomen and uses a small camera to explore the abdomen. There is also a tool on the camera that helps to extract tissue on the peritoneum to test for mesothelioma. These tissue biopsies are needed for confirmation of a diagnosis.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma BodyDoctors do not use a standard staging system when diagnosing peritoneal mesothelioma. Generally, before the tumors start to spread, the disease is centralized to the abdomen. As it progresses to stage 2, the mesothelioma may spread more but is still contained in the peritoneum. In the final stage, stage 4, the mesothelioma has spread to other organs, such as the liver and colon.

Prognosis

Although there isn’t currently a cure for peritoneal mesothelioma, many patients have a hopeful prognosis. The median survival time for patients who have not had the cytoreductive surgery is about a year; however, in patients who have had the surgery, survival times increase by up to five years. The most successful cases are those whose mesothelioma is detected in the earlier stages and begin treatment immediately. Most of theses cases include a cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC.

 

PATRICIA WALSH “IN HER OWN WORDS”


World record-holding Paralympian, engineer and competitive rower Patricia Walsh lives to serve as an example of life lived beyond perceived limitations. She won’t let blindness define her or put a ceiling on her lofty goals.

WATCH PATRICA’S VIDEO BELOW

By Patricia Walsh

I spend no time wishing my life was different. At age 5, I lost vision in my right eye due to a brain tumor over my optic cortex. In my early teens, scarring from surgeries resulted in total blindness with only a small field of light perception in my left eye. I can’t see my hand at the end of my arm.

Growing up as a person with blindness, I was spoon-fed the idea that every decision had to be governed by my limitations. From school to sports, if it wasn’t accessible, I was made to believe it was not for me. But a person who goes blind is still the same person they always were, and all my life I felt untapped potential. I was born ambitious. Staying inside where it is safe and sound was so limiting. I wanted to step outside the safety to explore my own capability. I knew in order to tap any of my potential, I would have to learn to adapt to the world; the world was not going to adapt to me.

When I expressed interest in attending college, I was told it would be an exercise in failure. But I knew that higher education was the key to becoming self-reliant. So I bet on myself and enrolled at Oregon State University. Was it tough? Unbelievably. Did I receive special treatment? None. But beyond the degrees I earned, I learned a lot about myself and my capacity to overcome in those years.

It was during college that I took up running. Learning to run undoubtedly changed my life. The first time I ran, I had no idea how to make it accessible. I found a trail near my house and ran with one foot on the concrete trail and the other on the gravel. I ran a mile successfully but had no plan how to get home, so I had to recruit help from another runner. The next day, I put a rock on the edge of the trail. I ran a half-mile one way, then a half-mile home. When I hit the rock, I fell. That is how I knew I was back home.

I later learned about guides. By tethering myself to a sighted person, I was eventually able to run 12 marathons, 2 long-distance triathlons, 2 ultramarathons, become a 5-time U.S. national champion, 2012 USA Triathlon athlete of the year, 3-time World Championship bronze medalist, 2016 Paralympian and world record-holder for fastest blind and low-vision long-distance triathlon.

Athletics changed the way I saw myself. For the first time, I had some fodder to believe in myself. I was not the blind girl anymore; I was a competitive athlete. When I was pushed out of my comfort zone, I could achieve so much more than I ever knew possible. I used to look at every decision and ask, “Is this accessible?” Nothing is made with me in mind, so the answer was always no. Ever since I ran that first mile, I look at every decision with the mindset that I may not know how I am going to do this, but I will find a way.

In 2006, I graduated from Oregon State with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science. I was employed immediately by Microsoft. I have since had a thriving career in engineering, currently as lead technical product manager for Dow Jones.

I am forever pushing to the next level in both my career and athletics. If I am not a little uncomfortable, then I am probably not pushing myself hard enough. Over the past year, I’ve been transitioning from a runner and a triathlete to a rower. To start over in a new sport is humbling. I made it to national team selection camp as a long shot. To be a long shot feels like a failure, even if it’s truly a sign of success to be considered at all as a newcomer in this sport. It is in these moments I remind myself that I am here to grow as an athlete. Being uncomfortable means I am on track to become better. I cannot claim experience on the water where there is none. I can demonstrate improvement every day. I can be coachable. I can be a supportive teammate.

I remind myself why I am here. It is my hope to help others live a life beyond their perceived limitations. What’s my next big goal? I aim to represent the U.S. in the 2020 Paralympics, and I believe this is an opportunity to lift up others in the process.

I’d love to help each and every one of you achieve your own blind ambitions. Read more of my story in my book, “Blind Ambition: How to Envision Your Limitless Potential and Achieve the Success You Want.”  

fb_img_15361014460953029919236202332956.jpg

JOSE RAMON CASTRO (9/11)


WE LOST A GOOD FRIEND ON THIS DAY. WE WILL ALWAYS HONOR HIM, AND THE MANY PEOPLE THAT LOST THEIR LIVES ON THIS HORRIBLE DAY. LOVE ONE ANOTHER AND THIS WORLD WILL BE A BETTER PLACE. RAY LOVED TO LAUGH AND PLAY MUSIC. REST IN PEACE. WE LOVE YOU.

20170904_091716

Jose Raymond Castro
Comfort Food With Spice

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Jose Raymond Castro began cooking at age 9 in a little house on Rosedale Avenue in the Bronx. His mother liked yellow, so she had painted the kitchen bright yellow. She let him cook eggs first. Then came rice, beans, pork, seasoning, the works. Mr. Castro, 37, was fascinated with food.

He started working at 13, delivering food, preparing food, cooking in restaurants around the city. When the World Trade Center was attacked on Tuesday, he was working as a prep cook in a food court on the 101st floor of one of the towers, readying food for the chef.

He specialized in sophisticated food, said his sister, Maritza. “Because that’s what people in Manhattan liked to eat.” But at home in the South Bronx, he cooked for his family: pernil, rice with gandules, lasagna, ziti, rice pudding, honey-glazed turkey on Thanksgiving.

“They had a son three years ago,” Ms. Castro said of her brother and his wife, Gladys. “Oh, that’s the love of his life, and I do mean the love of his life. He looks just like him, too. He’s light-skinned, dirty-blond hair, hazel eyes, skinny just like my brother.”

Profile courtesy of THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

PATRICIA WALSH “IN HER OWN WORDS”


World record-holding Paralympian, engineer and competitive rower Patricia Walsh lives to serve as an example of life lived beyond perceived limitations. She won’t let blindness define her or put a ceiling on her lofty goals.

WATCH PATRICA’S VIDEO BELOW

By Patricia Walsh

I spend no time wishing my life was different. At age 5, I lost vision in my right eye due to a brain tumor over my optic cortex. In my early teens, scarring from surgeries resulted in total blindness with only a small field of light perception in my left eye. I can’t see my hand at the end of my arm.

Growing up as a person with blindness, I was spoon-fed the idea that every decision had to be governed by my limitations. From school to sports, if it wasn’t accessible, I was made to believe it was not for me. But a person who goes blind is still the same person they always were, and all my life I felt untapped potential. I was born ambitious. Staying inside where it is safe and sound was so limiting. I wanted to step outside the safety to explore my own capability. I knew in order to tap any of my potential, I would have to learn to adapt to the world; the world was not going to adapt to me.

When I expressed interest in attending college, I was told it would be an exercise in failure. But I knew that higher education was the key to becoming self-reliant. So I bet on myself and enrolled at Oregon State University. Was it tough? Unbelievably. Did I receive special treatment? None. But beyond the degrees I earned, I learned a lot about myself and my capacity to overcome in those years.

It was during college that I took up running. Learning to run undoubtedly changed my life. The first time I ran, I had no idea how to make it accessible. I found a trail near my house and ran with one foot on the concrete trail and the other on the gravel. I ran a mile successfully but had no plan how to get home, so I had to recruit help from another runner. The next day, I put a rock on the edge of the trail. I ran a half-mile one way, then a half-mile home. When I hit the rock, I fell. That is how I knew I was back home.

I later learned about guides. By tethering myself to a sighted person, I was eventually able to run 12 marathons, 2 long-distance triathlons, 2 ultramarathons, become a 5-time U.S. national champion, 2012 USA Triathlon athlete of the year, 3-time World Championship bronze medalist, 2016 Paralympian and world record-holder for fastest blind and low-vision long-distance triathlon.

Athletics changed the way I saw myself. For the first time, I had some fodder to believe in myself. I was not the blind girl anymore; I was a competitive athlete. When I was pushed out of my comfort zone, I could achieve so much more than I ever knew possible. I used to look at every decision and ask, “Is this accessible?” Nothing is made with me in mind, so the answer was always no. Ever since I ran that first mile, I look at every decision with the mindset that I may not know how I am going to do this, but I will find a way.

In 2006, I graduated from Oregon State with a degree in electrical engineering and computer science. I was employed immediately by Microsoft. I have since had a thriving career in engineering, currently as lead technical product manager for Dow Jones.

I am forever pushing to the next level in both my career and athletics. If I am not a little uncomfortable, then I am probably not pushing myself hard enough. Over the past year, I’ve been transitioning from a runner and a triathlete to a rower. To start over in a new sport is humbling. I made it to national team selection camp as a long shot. To be a long shot feels like a failure, even if it’s truly a sign of success to be considered at all as a newcomer in this sport. It is in these moments I remind myself that I am here to grow as an athlete. Being uncomfortable means I am on track to become better. I cannot claim experience on the water where there is none. I can demonstrate improvement every day. I can be coachable. I can be a supportive teammate.

I remind myself why I am here. It is my hope to help others live a life beyond their perceived limitations. What’s my next big goal? I aim to represent the U.S. in the 2020 Paralympics, and I believe this is an opportunity to lift up others in the process.

I’d love to help each and every one of you achieve your own blind ambitions. Read more of my story in my book, “Blind Ambition: How to Envision Your Limitless Potential and Achieve the Success You Want.”  

fb_img_15361014460953029919236202332956.jpg

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